Managing Mental Health When You Start College Or University.

(image: Pexels: Ketut Subiyanto)

Going to college or university is one of the most exciting life events we experience, but it can also be one of the most daunting. This is a period of upheaval and change, which often triggers a mixture of emotions. If you’re preparing to start a new course or move to a different town or city, here’s a handy guide to managing mental health.

Make your new base feel like home

One of the best ways to settle into a new area and adjust to a different routine and environment is to make your new base feel like home. Whether you’re living in student accommodation or you’re renting a flat or a house, try to be proactive in creating a homely, welcoming feel. Decorate your bedroom and turn it into a sanctuary that makes you feel relaxed and calm. Put photographs up on the walls, use soft furnishings to add a cosy feel and choose colours that you love. Create a space that celebrates your style and personality and makes you feel safe and comfortable. 

Socialise

Making friends is one of the biggest challenges for students. Some people are naturally very sociable and they’ll start conversations and build relationships without even thinking about it, but for others, creating bonds is more difficult. Try to socialise and meet people through activities, lectures, classes and group sessions and societies and clubs. Use your hobbies and interests to find people with shared passions and don’t panic if you don’t click with the people in your flat or on your course immediately. Keep putting yourself out there and you’ll find your crowd. It’s important to be yourself and to find friends who make you feel confident and valued. You shouldn’t feel like you have to change or put on an act. 

Look after yourself

Going to university is synonymous with partying, staying up late and embracing the experience of living in student halls. It’s fun to go out and enjoy a few drinks with new friends, but try to look after yourself as best you can. Get enough sleep, stay hydrated, keep an eye on how much you drink and try to follow a healthy diet. Exercise daily, spend time outdoors, hang out with friends and keep in touch with family members. 

(image: Pexels Pixabay)

Don’t be afraid to talk

It can be incredibly stressful to start a new life at university, especially if you’ve never been away from home before, or you find it hard to make friends. If you’re struggling with your mental health, or you feel anxious or low for a prolonged period, don’t be afraid to talk. Open up to friends you trust or relatives, speak to your GP, or research resources you can access through your college or university. It may also be helpful to speak to others who are in the same boat via online communities and social media groups. There are also free helplines you can call such as Samaritans 116 123 (UK).

Going to college or university is an adventure, but it can also be an upheaval. It’s crucial to look after yourself and manage your mental health. Socialise and make friends, create a happy, calming home environment and take care of your body and mind. Talk to people and seek advice if you are finding life tough. 

This article was written by a freelance writer.

PTSD Therapies And Which One Might Be Right for You by Kara Masterson.

(image: Nick Hewings, unsplash)

PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) is one of the most commonly recognised mental health issues because most people endure at least one traumatic experience in their lifetime. Though it’s commonly associated with war veterans, PTSD can occur from enduring the trauma of an abusive relationship, ill health, the loss of a loved one, or the loss of a job.

Thankfully, there are many PTSD therapies you can choose from in order to experience healing. 

Prolonged Exposure Therapy 

When people struggle with a form of PTSD, avoidance is one of the most common approaches. After all, no one wants to revisit the trauma. However, that trauma impacts the way a person lives in the future. By facing the trauma and incorporating activities such as deep breathing exercises, you’ll decrease the amount of power that traumatic event holds over you. Exposure comes in a number of ways- but should be done with a qualified therapist. One example of exposure is to record yourself as you talk about the event that traumatised you. As you listen to the recording, you can do a calming activity such as colouring in order to help you cope and heal with the story of your trauma. 

EMDR Therapy 

EMDR stands for “eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing”, and it’s been instrumental in healing people who’ve dealt with traumatic events. Actress Sandra Bullock famously discussed how she used the assistance of an EMDR therapist in order to deal with various traumatic events in her lifetime. By thinking about the event as you concentrate on something your therapist is doing, you can help to associate a positive experience with that traumatic one. Therapists use tools such as flashing lights, sounds, and movement in order to help with the healing journey. In order for it to be effective, consistent sessions for a few months are the best line of action, with a therapist you trust. 

Cognitive Processing Therapy 

Cognitive Processing Therapy is a PTSD treatment method that allows you to sit down and talk with your therapist about the traumatic event (or events) you’ve endured. You’ll need to process how you feel like it impacted your life. Once you’ve talked through it all, you’re tasked with the responsibility of writing it all down. The act of journaling helps to stimulate your mind to ponder on ways you can cope and adjust in order to move forward in the most abundant manner. Your therapist serves as a guide to help you process and heal with the truest version of the story of what happened to you. 

Stress Inoculation Training 

This method for healing your PTSD is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy. With this training method, you’ll learn various techniques such as self-massages in order to relax and get rid of the stress that’s associated with your trauma. You don’t need to be in a private space to do this type of training. It can be done on your own or within the safe space of a group. 

As the conversation surrounding mental health shifts, don’t be afraid or ashamed to get help. You don’t have to silently endure the negative impact of PTSD. While therapy requires you to show up and do the work, you can move past your trauma and experience healing. 

This article was written by writer Kara Masterson.

The Anxiety Train: A New Year by Eleanor

(Image: Unsplash)

Hi everyone,

I had been amazed over the summer by how much better I was doing with certain aspects of my anxiety and panic. I had a few panicky moments/ days but I was able to pick myself up and feel better quite quickly after.

At the moment though I can feel myself dipping back into anxious patterns. I had a panic attack in bed a few weeks ago, triggered by certain life stressors. Since then, I wake up flooded with anxiety and not feeling able to face the day/ feel like a doormouse and want to hibernate or hide. Sometimes this happens if I get triggered by something eg life stress or it can happen as the fluctuating rhythms of bipolar disorder. I am usually OK by late afternoon/evening but the mornings can be hard.

Change in seasons with less light, feeling extra pressures can lead my mind to try and protect me from a perceived fear due to past traumas (fear of judgement, fear of feeling exposed). This can mean that seeing people. going out a lot etc can become very difficult- welcome to social anxiety again. However, I know that this will not last forever.

This week, I had a good session with my therapist who advised me to try and take more time in the mornings to write, practise breathing and think about whats going on for me, with the aim of reducing anxiety. I do find this really hard as my default can be to shut down to look after myself (and hide away/sleep)- as my brain (subconscious) perceives a threat somewhere…

I have been through this before and come out the other side- and so I know I will be OK (and ironically, there is no need to panic over it) but its still stressful… and I just wish it wasn’t like this.

I am a person who loves routine and when I get out of a routine or pause, anxiety can flood in too.

I call it the anxiety train because it feels a bit like riding a fast train/ a roller coaster of ups and downs. It doesn’t stop fully but it can suddenly hurtle me and I have to calm myself. Its based on previous behaviour patterns that served me at a time when my brain thought it needed to protect me as a teenager and although I have had years of therapy and take medication, it can sometimes come back.

I will be alright in the end, you’ll see (Mrs Potts- beauty and the beast). I have lots of support but wanted to be honest about where I am.

We are approaching a Jewish New Year, and I pray that I will be blessed with better health and less anxiety coming (as well as good things and health for my loved ones).

Thanks for reading and allowing me to be honest,

Shana tova and only happiness. If you’re struggling, please reach out to someone you trust/love or Samaritans helpline. My DMs are open too,

Eleanor x

Mental Health At Work: First Aid Products Have Surged In Popularity In 2022.

(image: MHFA England)

Awareness days, weeks and months have helped to familiarise people all over the world with the term “Mental Health First Aid”. Now, first aid retailer FirstAid.co.uk reports a 260% uplift in interest for MHFA products on their site, noting that an increase in work-related stress, depression and anxiety cases each year is the most likely driving force.

The retailer has now sold more Mental Health First Aid items this year so far than everyday travel and motoring first aid kits.

Data from the Health and Safety Executive shows that cases of work-related ill health (of which 50% are stress, depression and anxiety) have risen almost 28% since 2015, despite physical injuries being in decline since 2000.

Their data also shows that 820,000 people in Great Britain suffered from work-related stress, depression and anxiety in 2021, compared to 441,000 people who sustained a physical injury at work.

“According to Mental Health First Aid England, one in six people of working age in the UK is experiencing symptoms of mental ill health at any given time.” Says Mike Thakoordin, MHFA Instructor and Suicide First Aid Associate at FirstAid.co.uk“We know that around 81% of employers have increased their focus on employee mental health since the pandemic began, and it is fair to say that awareness days and events are doing their part to sustain that focus. 

“During the first week of Stress Awareness Month in April we had an 85% increase in the number of people visiting our stress-related products compared to 2021, and we’re anticipating a similar surge between Suicide Prevention Day in September and World Mental Health Day in October as individual and business shoppers research items and guidance that can support those who are struggling.”

(image: Unsplash)

While events and awareness days like these play a big part in the ongoing rise in interest around mental health-related products online, it’s the persisting growth in the number of people struggling with poor mental health that is likely the bigger factor at play. Despite several years of employers saying they’re taking mental health more seriously, the reality is that a huge number of people each year still find themselves with too much work, not enough rest, workplace politics issues and concerns over job security – among other things.

“For several years running now, the HSE has reported an increase in the number of people taken ill by work-related stress, depression and anxiety.”  Thakoordin goes on to say. “Poor workplace mental health has knock-on effects in many other areas, and we hope that this increase in people shopping for MHFA materials translates into a greater number of workplaces offering meaningful, consistent support.

“With the 2-day Mental Health First Aid course recently being updated, now is the time to get enrolled and play your part in making workplaces safer from a mental health perspective.”


For information on how to recognise stress in the workplace, and advice on dealing with stress,
visit FirstAid’s Stress In The Workplace page.

This article was written in collaboration with First Aid.co.uk

Are Workplaces Doing Enough for Mental Health in a Post-Covid Era?

(image: Mateus Campos Felipe at Unsplash)

The global coronavirus pandemic brought mental health and personal wellbeing to the forefront of our working life. As more companies return to the office, employers need to think about whether or not they are doing enough to make mental health in the workplace a priority. We speak to consumer finance startup, CapitalBean.com, to get some insight.

Workplace Mental Health Post-Covid

“The coronavirus pandemic highlighted serious concerns regarding mental health and personal wellbeing,” explains Richard Allan of Capital Bean.

“With ongoing uncertainty and a heightened sense of risk, it could be argued that we were experiencing an unprecedented global mental health crisis, often with no end in sight.” 

From a workplace perspective especially, many workers were facing uncertainty regarding their job stability, redundancies and, for some, navigating an entirely new way of working and interacting with colleagues.”

“In response, many companies started to take employee mental health more seriously and implement frameworks and best practices; however, now that we are returning to normal and trying to leave Covid-19 in the past, what is the extent to which companies are keeping up with their commitment to employee mental health?”

The Return to the Office

During the Covid 19 pandemic, the majority of workers were learning how to do their jobs remotely. This presented a range of new challenges to navigate and loneliness was widely reported. Not only were people missing the daily social interactions with their colleagues, but they were also finding the blurred lines between home life and work life difficult to navigate – with people’s homes doubling up as their offices, many workers were finding it difficult to switch off and reported working more hours. 

Now that people are starting to return to the office, after adjusting to nearly three years of remote working, they are being faced with new challenges. People are finding the return to work difficult and reporting a great deal of anxiety regarding social interaction. In addition, after working from home, they are now having to juggle their home commitments alongside going to the office. Whether it is squeezing in laundry, balancing childcare, or even factoring in an extra hour for the commute, the return to the office is proving more difficult than expected for many and is causing stress and anxiety for some. Others prefer working from home, so there is a balance.

The Employer’s Role

Millions of workers are returning to the office or workplace with changed attitudes and new expectations. In order to attract and retain talent, it is important for employers to acknowledge this and respond empathetically. Many companies have included mental health in their promises to employees on return to the office but now it is their time to demonstrate that this is not merely lip service. 

Employers need to proactively introduce programmes that are promoting workplace mental wellbeing and help employees with the challenges that they are facing. It is important for workplaces to create a psychologically safe space for workers and welcome conversations surrounding mental health and support.

(image: Luis Villasmil at Unsplash)

The Great Resignation And Mental Health at Work

After the pandemic, more people than ever before started evaluating their working life and what their main priorities were. With new focus on mental wellbeing and work-life balance, workers started to question what their expectations were and what they required from their place of work. The great resignation, the mass exodus of millions of workers in 2021, left employers having to think about what they needed to offer workers to not only attract talent initially, but retain it. 

 Workers who were asked about the great resignation pinpointed lack of workplace communication, sense of belonging, employee-manager relationship and toxic environments all as reasons to leave their jobs. 

In a post-Covid era (and what should have been before this), it will fall to the employer to make sure their staff feel looked after, not just financially but also emotionally.

Employers need to make their employees feel like they are taken care of, respected and acknowledged, and that their personal wellbeing and mental health is a top priority. Going forward, this will be more important for jobseekers than free office lunches or staff drinks.

We all have mental health and it is vital this is acknowledged and cared for, and not ignored in the workplace.

This article contains links to partner organisations.

A Lovely Review Of My Book ‘Bring Me To Light’ By Deb Wilk at Living Bipolar Blog.

(image: https://www.pauladennan.com/reviews/)

Sometimes, you receive amazing book reviews on the internet and don’t realise they are there!

Yesterday, I stumbled upon Deb Wilk’s blog Living Bipolar – Deb has lived with bipolar disorder for many years and very kindly reviewed my book last year. She lives in the USA and is a talented blogger, sharing about her life living with bipolar.

I don’t always know what to expect with reviews, but this was so positive so thank you Deb for reading, enjoying and recommending my book Bring me to Light: Embracing my Bipolar and Social Anxiety. Heres some quotes from the review:

Every word, paragraph and chapter of Bring Me to Light was utterly mesmerizing.  Eleanor Segall’s account of her battle with bipolar 1, panic attacks, and crippling social anxiety is so vibrant that the reader feels as though they are experiencing it right alongside her.

I would love to describe the book in detail, but I am not going to give anything away because this book is an absolute must-read.  Anyone who is bipolar or loves someone who is, should read this story.  It is a moving narrative that anyone, even those who do not suffer with mental illness, should read.  

She is now an extremely forceful voice in the mental health community, and this accolade is incredibly well deserved.  Please read this book.  You will find it well worthwhile and, I am certain, as enthralling as I did.” (Deb Wilk, living bipolar blog)

To read more of Debs review click here

Bring me to Light is available now on Amazon and in all good bookshops (including Waterstones, W H Smith and Blackwells and is available globally).

Sleep Expert Reveals How To Stay Cool On Hot Nights And What To Avoid.

Image: Unsplash

This summer has been one of the hottest on record. August has been no exception, with the Met Office predicting the hot weather will continue. As Britons all over the country look to stay cool at night, experts at Bed Kingdom share their advice to prevent overheating and to get a good night’s sleep throughout the warmer months. If you’re trying – and struggling – to keep your body temperature under control at night, try these tips:

Avoid strenuous exercise, alcohol and spicy food

Strenuous exercise before bed gets your blood pumping and keeps your heart rate and body temperature up. Doing this before bed will keep your body feeling warm and will prevent you from staying cool as you try to nod off. Instead it’s best to exercise in the morning when temperatures tend to be cooler. 

Alcohol will make you feel hot. Remember the ‘beer blanket’? It’s the warmth your body feels as it tries to manage alcohol consumption. While your body is not actually heating up, it will feel like it and may prevent you from feeling cool and comfortable at night.

Spicy food often contains capsaicin, which can increase your body temperature and interrupt your sleep. Also, eating spicy food before you go to bed may give you indigestion, making it difficult to feel able to drift off as your body battles discomfort.

Practice mindfulness and meditation

Anxiety can cause your fight-or-flight response, which can lead to night sweats in bed, which is a common stress symptom. Setting aside ten minutes for a mindfulness exercise before bed, such as meditation or journalling can relieve some worries and prime your mind for a good night’s sleep, helping you to stay cool throughout.

Turn off unnecessary electronics before bed

Electronic devices such as computers, games consoles and TVs can get hot after use, leaving rooms, especially smaller ones, feeling stuffy and trapped with heat. It’s best to switch these devices off an hour before you go to bed to let the room cool down. This also has the added benefit of preventing the blue light from devices interfering with your sleep cycle, letting you drift off to sleep easier at night.

(image: Sincerely media via unsplash)

Switch to breathable bedding – and avoid these

You may be using bedding that is not breathable enough for the summer months. Cooling bed sheets should wick moisture away from you and help you to regulate your core body temperature. 

Cotton is one of the more popular fabrics for bedding as it is breathable and versatile. It can keep you cool on hot summer nights and warmer in winter, depending on the weaving and thread count. Cooling cotton sheets are typically between a thread count of 250 and 300, and should not be more than 500. Cotton is also durable enough to last years of use.

Linen fabrics can keep you cool at night. Bed linen can absorb a fifth of its weight before beginning to feel damp, making it an effective choice to keep the fabric fresh if you often get hot at night. This fabric type can be less likely to stick to your body.

Bamboo fabric has become popular over the years as it is an eco-friendly alternative to synthetics. It can be more breathable than cotton, and the natural, soft and durable material is a good choice for those that have allergies.

Eucalyptus sheets, like bamboo, are another eco-friendly option made of natural materials, which can effectively wick moisture and stay breathable all night. It can dry quickly, deter dust mites and is hypoallergenic. 

Many people choose microfibre bedding as it is a low-cost option. However, it is made from synthetic fibres that aren’t very breathable. Other fabrics to avoid during the summer are polyester, nylon, rayon and silk. 

Have a light meal for dinner – avoid heavy fats and carbs

Eating a meal too close to your bedtime can be harmful to your sleep. The more food you eat, the more uncomfortable you may feel. Heavy meals tend to be high in fats and carbohydrates, which takes more energy for your body to break down. This could lead to feeling bloated and uncomfortable when trying to sleep at night.

The recommended space between your last meal of the day and your bedtime is about three hours, which gives time for your body to process any food eaten. Opting to eat fats and carbohydrates earlier in the day, and eating a light meal at night, will require less from your body while you drift off, as it has done the work to break food down earlier in the day.

Take a shower before bed

It’s a great feeling to wash the day away and then climb into fresh bed sheets at night. Showers can help to regulate our body temperature, which can ease us into a peaceful sleep. When it’s hot, a lukewarm shower can cool your core temperature down. A cool shower can be more beneficial than a hot shower to help you fall asleep faster. However, a hot shower can still help as your body temperature will change as you dry off. Whether you prefer to take a hot or cold shower, try to avoid extreme temperatures, as they can negatively affect how you sleep. 

The heat can cause stress both physically and mentally, so make sure you look after your health.

This article was written by a freelance writer and contains a link.

My Interview On Life With Bipolar Disorder by Best For You NHS

(image: Best for You NHS)

The team at Best For You NHS interviewed me about my life journey with bipolar disorder and anxiety. I hope it helps anyone, particularly young people, who are struggling.

You can read the interview that I did with Annabel here. Trigger warning as discusses suicidal thoughts, being in hospital and sexual assault.!

Thank you Annabel and team!

Best for You is a new NHS programme in London to help young people and their families access mental health support We know many can’t access the support they do desperately need and CAMHS services here in the UK are overstretched. I hope that by sharing my story it helps young people feel less alone, but we desperately need more funding into childrens mental health services too!

(Images by Best for You NHS)

Eleanor x

How To Create Healthy Daily Habits by Sierra Powell

Photo from  Pexels

Your mental attitude often influences your altitude. People who are happy and successful don’t get there by chance alone. To go where you want to go, you need to take deliberate action, practice self care, and bring energy to everyday activities.. To live the life you want, here are some good ideas to follow, if you are able:

1. Get Out of Bed Early

Even if you don’t have to get up at the same time as the sun every day, it’s still important to get up at a reasonable (early) time so your body can function at its best. The human body and brain have evolved to follow a circadian rhythm, which helps to regulate sleep and wake patterns set by our natural environment, specifically the sun’s rising and setting. This rhythm was set by the natural environment millions of years ago and passed down through generations of humans. This natural circadian rhythm also aligns with the natural cortisol levels inside the body.

Cortisol is a hormone widely recognized for its function in our metabolism, immune system, stress response, and overall energy levels. Cortisol levels start to increase 2-3 hours after the start of sleep and continue to climb until the early morning, which helps wake us up. This rise in cortisol levels occurs in a balanced condition. The cortisol levels in the body will reach their highest point between 8:30 and 9:00 in the morning, and then they will fall as the day progresses slowly. As a result, optimizing one’s energy levels, level of productivity, and general health may be accomplished by the simple practice of adhering to one’s natural circadian cycle and cortisol levels. Note: cortisol can also increase anxiety, which can explain why you may feel more anxious upon waking.

2. Establish a Set Morning Routine

Find out what gets your day off to a roaring start and make it your priority every morning. For instance, if you like to reflect before starting your day give self guided meditation a try. This is a  surefire method to help relieve tension, quiet a buzzing mind, and delve deeper inside yourself. Meditation can improve overall health and wellbeing. Doing a meaningful activity first thing in the morning will help you get off to a good start and be more proactive throughout the day. Rather than racing through the morning to make up for a lost time, beginning your day with a routine may help reduce stress, improve mental tiredness, and boost productivity. If you have no idea where to start then you may find it helpful to examine others morning routines and see what works for you.

3. Read

Reading books is one of the most effective ways to expand one’s horizons intellectually and creatively. Reading in a state of immersion enhances attention and has a relaxing impact similar to meditation. Moreover, reading before bed might help you sleep better. Books that are not works of fiction, in particular, are a great instrument for expanding one’s horizons, developing new ideas, and looking for inspiration. In addition, they give real-life examples of how to deal with a variety of tough situations and give advice on how to get through them.

4. Go on a Stroll

Step outside for some exercise and taking in some oxygen can lift your spirits immediately, help you think more clearly, and give you a break from working on your computer. It is also a very underappreciated exercise that may make your heart and lungs stronger, lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, alleviate high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels, soothe joint discomfort, and much more. It is an easy way to enhance your general health that is entertaining and has a minimal effect, to put it another way.

 5. Fuel Your Body with Healthy Food

It is becoming more common practice for medical professionals to suggest plant-based diets to all their patients, not only those suffering from conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease. If one cannot wholly commit to a vegan or vegetarian diet, even making an effort to consume more plant-based foods whenever it is practical to do so may cause a significant improvement to one’s overall health.

If you make it a point to concentrate on developing wholesome routines that are manageable for you on a day-to-day basis and that you look forward to doing, you will have a better chance of sticking with them over the long run. Creating healthy routines for one’s daily life will require an investment of time, energy, and focus, but this does not indicate that it is impossible to do so.. Instead, steer clear of drastic solutions, focus on developing good habits, and take your time to help guarantee that your health and success will be long-lasting.

This blog was written by writer Sierra Powell

11 Most Effective Ways for People to Protect Their Mental Health- A Guide by The Mental Health Foundation.

(image: Mental Health Foundation)

The 11 most effective ways for people to protect their mental health are revealed in a guide launched today by the Mental Health Foundation. 

The free guide, Our Best Mental Health Tips is based on the Foundation’s own ground-breaking study on what protects people from common problems such as anxiety and depression.  

The innovative study on which the new guide is based combined existing evidence about how we can protect our mental health with experts’ views, alongside the opinions of members of the public. 

Dr Antonis Kousoulis, who led the research and is a Director of the Foundation, said: ‘Our new guide encourages us to take care of the fundamentals of life – our relationships, our experiences, our bodies and our finances.  

The evidence shows that this is far more likely to keep us mentally healthy than the gimmicks and miracle cures promoted by some in the ‘wellness’ industry, who prey on our vulnerability. 

The truth is, there are no quick fixes for good mental or physical health. What works is developing healthy habits in our daily lives, that help us to feel OK and able to cope with everything. 

For example, in our new guide we talk about getting more from our sleep, learning to understand and manage our feelings, planning things to look forward to and getting help with money problems.’ 

The full list of mental health-promoting actions suggested by the new guide is as follows: 

  • Get closer to nature 
  • Learn to understand and manage your feelings 
  • Talk to someone you trust for support 
  • Be aware of using drugs and/or alcohol to cope with difficult feelings 
  • Try to make the most of your money and get help with problem debts 
  • Get more from your sleep 
  • Be kind and help create a better world 
  • Keep moving 
  • Eat healthy food
  • Be curious and open-minded to new experiences 
  • Plan things to look forward to 

Most members of the public involved in the study had experienced their own, or family members’ problems with mental health, so had the benefit of hindsight when assessing what helps most with prevention.  

The study was published in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Health Promotion

The new guide (and the research on which it is based) acknowledges that people may be unable to follow some of its suggestions, for instance because the place they live makes it impossible to sleep well or spend time close to nature. 

Dr Kousoulis added: ‘Enjoying good mental health should be an equally accessible goal for all of us, yet it is often out of reach for many. Government action is needed to create the circumstances that solve problems that are beyond individuals’ reach, and help prevent people having problems with mental health in the first place.’ 

You can download the new guide free of charge from the Mental Health Foundation website. You can also order hard copies by post, with a small charge.

About the Mental Health Foundation   

Our vision is of good mental health for all. The Mental Health Foundation works to prevent mental health problems. We drive change towards a mentally healthy society for all, and support communities, families and individuals to lead mentally healthy lives with a particular focus on those at greatest risk. The Foundation is the home of Mental Health Awareness Week www.mentalhealth.org.uk  

This is a non sponsored article written by the Mental Health Foundation.