How to Improve Employee Engagement and Wellbeing In Your Workplace.

(image: Brooke Cagle, Unsplash)

Employee engagement is a critical factor in the success of any organisation. By encouraging employee engagement, organisations can create a workplace that is both productive and enjoyable. In this guide, we’ll look at some effective strategies for improving employee engagement and getting more out of your workforce.

Set Clear Expectations But Check In…

One of the most important steps to creating an engaged workplace is setting clear expectations. Make sure employees understand their roles and responsibilities, as well as the company’s goals and objectives. This will help them stay focused on what needs to be done and better understand how their work contributes to overall organisational success. This also includes setting measurable objectives and providing regular feedback so employees know when they’ve achieved their goals.

These objectives must take into account any mental health issues or disability if the employee has one, when they begin. Reasonable adjustments can be made for employees who need them.

Foster Collaboration

Encourage collaboration between team members by creating opportunities for them to work together. This can be done through brainstorming sessions, collaborative problem-solving activities, or team-building exercises. Working together helps employees build trust and understanding, leading to a more engaged workforce. You can also do this by providing resources such as group communication tools, flexible working arrangements, or company social events.

Invest in Adequate Training

Provide employees with adequate training and professional development opportunities. This will help ensure they have the knowledge, expertise, and confidence to perform their tasks effectively. Investing in employee training also shows them that you value their skills and are willing to support their growth. Additionally, ensure you provide enough resources and support for employees to do their jobs. This could include access to the right technology, adequate workspace, and a comfortable work environment.

Promote a Positive Work Environment and Wellbeing

Creating a positive work environment is essential for keeping employees engaged and motivated. Encourage an open dialogue between team members, provide recognition for good work, and offer incentives to reward outstanding performance. Additionally, implement policies that promote equality and respect among all staff members regardless of differences in race, gender, or background. Furthermore, make sure you have staff trained in mental health first aid and employee wellbeing- this is vital in ensuring a safe and happy workplace.

(image: Annie Spratt, Unsplash)

Utilise Technology

Technology can be used as an effective tool for improving employee engagement. For example, goal-setting software can help employees track their progress and stay motivated. Collaboration tools like Slack or Microsoft Teams can also encourage employees to work together and share ideas more easily. Technology also helps businesses stay connected with their remote employees. By providing resources like video conferencing, instant messaging, and file sharing, organisations can ensure that everyone stays on the same page regardless of their physical location.

Measure And Assess Progress

Finally, organisations should measure and assess employee engagement on an ongoing basis. This can be done through surveys or interviews to understand how employees feel about their work environment and what they believe could be improved. Tracking progress over time will also help businesses identify trends and areas of improvement that can be addressed in the future.

Don’t forget to also measure the success of any initiatives or programs you implement. Ensure that employees know what is being done to improve engagement and understand how their participation in them makes a difference. This will help ensure they remain involved, motivated, and engaged with their work. Additionally, collaboration in this way can boost wellbeing if done correctly.

Communicate Regularly

It is also important to keep employees in the loop about any changes that may be happening within the organisation. This includes ensuring they know about new projects, goals, or initiatives. Also, fostering an open dialogue will help ensure that employees feel their opinions are heard and appreciated. Regular check-ins can also be beneficial in helping to keep employees up-to-date on the progress of their work.

Creating a culture of employee engagement within your organisation takes time and effort, but it is essential for success. By implementing these strategies, you can ensure that your team is motivated and engaged so that everyone works together for the common goal of organisational success.

Overall, organisations can improve their employee engagement by setting objectives, fostering collaboration, investing in adequate training, creating a positive work environment, utilising technology, and measuring progress. These strategies will help create an engaged workforce that can contribute to a more productive and enjoyable work experience for everyone involved.

Additionally, these techniques are essential for ensuring that employees stay motivated, energised, and committed to achieving their goals. By taking the time to implement these strategies, organisations can ensure they are creating an environment where their employees can thrive.

This article was written by a freelance writer.

5 Lessons Football Has Taught Me About Life And Mental Health by Rose Atkinson-Carter

(image: Unsplash: Konstantin Ekdokimov)

It’s true what they say: the best lessons are taught outside the classroom. We’re all constantly learning and growing in the most unexpected ways and dedicating yourself to any sport or hobby is bound to teach you more than you imagined, if you’re open to it.

I’ve played football for almost 20 years and learned a thing or two about dedication and persistence, which have affected my approach towards my mental health. Sure, there have been times when I’ve felt like the cons have outweighed the pros — training in a blizzard is never fun — but when all is said and done, football has helped me weather my own personal storms.

Along the way, I’ve picked up a few practical life skills and lessons that extend beyond the football pitch, to that big game called Life.

1.   A healthy routine can get you through tough times

The first lesson football taught me is to consistently show up for myself, especially on the days when I don’t feel like it. Growing up, building habits was never something I gave much thought to. Football practice was just second nature.

My football “habit” has been essential in getting me through times of low motivation and stress. Motivation is not a flat line — it’s something that fluctuates. There will be days when motivation alone will not be enough to get us to lace up and buckle down, and taking a mental health day is never something to be ashamed of. However, playing a team sport, or at least having a schedule to follow, is a great way to help yourself along on days when you need an external motivation to keep going.

2.   Prioritising ‘hobbies’ can create balance

When work piles up, it’s easy to stop prioritising your own wellbeing and to lose sight of what’s important in the grand scheme of things. Playing football has forced me to consider my priorities and this has, in turn, helped me create balance.

Sometimes, playing a sport when you’re busy with other things adds pressure. It’s tempting to cut out the ‘non-essentials’ — the hobbies and things that don’t seem to contribute to your career or relationships. However, I’ve found that prioritizing football has had a net positive effect on my life. It feels counterintuitive, but letting your mind take a break allows you to clear your mind, reduce stress, and work and feel better.

3.   You don’t always have to get along to produce great results

You don’t need to get along with everybody to get results. But if there’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that you don’t all need to be BFFs to win a game.

Teamwork isn’t about creating a group of like-minded individuals who see eye-to-eye on everything. It’s about identifying everyone’s individual strengths and using that aggregated power to pull in the same direction. So while you don’t have to love everyone’s company, the team — the people you surround yourself with — is incredibly important in shaping your experiences.

4.   When you feel like quitting, ask yourself why

Wanting to quit something is quite natural, especially the longer you’ve spent doing something. When the urge to quit strikes, it’s good to explore where that feeling is coming from. For me, playing with strangers at university was incredibly stressful, but I eventually had to acknowledge that the problem wasn’t football, but social anxiety.

One thing that has helped me find answers has been to first recognise the feeling, and then try to drill down and understand where exactly it’s coming from. Asking myself ‘what is it that I think will happen if I don’t quit?’ helps me identify the elements of activities I dread or have negative feelings about (e.g. “I will have to keep seeing stressful person X every day”), which then means I can make conscious decisions without rushing into quitting.

5.   Quitting doesn’t make you a quitter

Then there are the times when you try a few more times, and the feeling of wanting to quit still remains. While football taught me a lot about perseverance, I’ve also had a hard time knowing when quitting might actually be the best thing for me.

A common misconception is that quitting is the easiest option, or that quitting “makes” you a quitter. But think about it this way: leaving something behind involves making an active decision to change. The trouble is, if you don’t know what you’re trading it in for, it’s much easier to just keep going with the status quo.

Quitting something after careful consideration can actually be the best way to continue to show up for yourself. Ultimately, there’s a huge difference between giving up on yourself and giving up something that no longer brings you joy and comfort.

Football, to me, has always been more than just fancy footwork. From showing me how to get up after a few tackles to accepting defeats and working hard towards my goals, it has been one of my most influential teachers. As the final whistle blows, I hope some of the lessons it has taught me can be useful to you as well.

Rose Atkinson-Carter is a writer with Reedsy, a marketplace that connects authors hoping to get published with the world’s best book editors, designers, and marketers. She loves to advise authors on topics like book formatting and literary copyright — and to play football, of course!