Life Changing Habits to Bring into the New Year: Guest blog By Vanessa Hill

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(image: http://gandlblog.com/17-inspirational-new-years-quotes-for-2020/)

The start of 2020 is a special time. Not only are we lucky enough to be able to start a new year, but we also have the privilege of beginning a new decade. We have the opportunity to define the next ten years of our lives, which means we should probably be starting it off on the right foot by developing good habits. Here are three life-changing habits that you can start doing right now to ensure you have a great decade.

Eat Healthy Foods 

The first habit you need to bring into the new year with you is making your health a priority, and one of the easiest ways to do this is by maintaining a healthy diet. Your diet plays a huge role in how you feel mentally and physically. It’s where your body sources it’s energy from, so when you put good things in your body you feel good. Now, this doesn’t mean you have to completely give up your favourite guilty pleasures. Try thinking of things you can incorporate into your diet rather than thinking of things you want to get rid of. Commit to eating more leafy greens rather than swearing off chocolate. Choose to eat whole grain rather than avoiding carbs.

If you’re not entirely sure where to start, you can always sign up for healthy eating program that shows you exactly how to transform your eating habits. Even if losing weight isn’t your goal, you’ll find that making healthier choices with your nutrition will leave you feeling better, and give you the energy to take on the year.

Please note to speak to a doctor before you start any new eating program and take care if you are struggling with your mental health alongside. 

Develop a consistent sleep routine

Sleep is an underrated body function that too many of us take for granted. Our bodies use this time to repair damages, replenish our energy, and restore us to a functioning state. Lack of sleep negatively affects every part of your body. If you’re tired of struggling with brain fog, lack of energy, and irritability, then developing a good sleeping pattern is the place to start.

Try to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day– even on the weekends. This may be a bit tricky if you’re younger and you find yourself spending your weekend nights out on the town, if you travel a lot, or if you have young children. But once you come up with a schedule that works, try to stick to this as closely as you can. You’ll find that your days are more bearable and you might even get deeper sleep at night. Don’t be afraid to consult a sleep specialist if you’re having trouble getting a good night’s rest. They’ll be able to help you get the best sleep possible, which will turn into you living the best year possible. 

Practice Gratitude

While people are eager to think of the things they want to change at the beginning of the year, it’s important to show your appreciation for the things that you do have and for where you are right now. You can show gratitude on a macro-scale, where you’re thankful for your friends and family, for your amazing job, or the events that you’re lucky enough to experience. On a micro-scale, you can be thankful that you had enough money for coffee today, for example.

Either way, taking the time to notice and appreciate the things that are going well around you will give you a positive outlook on life, and it will remind you of all the reasons you have to smile. You have so much to be thankful for, you should regularly remind yourself of that.

About the Author

Vanessa is a content writer who’s passionate about spreading knowledge and joy to the world. When she’s not writing, she enjoys exploring the streets in a foreign country where she can immerse herself in different cultures.

Winter Cosiness: A very happy Festive Season to you!

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(image: Pinterest)

Thank you for supporting Be Ur Own Light blog and our mental health mission this year. We wish you all- from Rob and I, a wonderful festive season- whether you celebrate Christmas or Chanukah (like us), whether you get together with family and friends for magical, cosy nights, good TV and a glass of wine, I hope you enjoy it!

We will be spending time with family and friends, lighting our menorahs and eating doughnuts. This year we will be visiting my in laws, which should be lovely.

If you need help because you are struggling with your mental health, the Samaritans line is always open for free,non judgemental listening: 116 123 is the UK number.

Wishing you all a wonderful break, a cosy, happy, safe and peaceful one,

Love.

Eleanor x

 

Taking care of your child’s mental health: Guest blog by Chloe Walker

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(image: Power of Positivity)

Mental health is extremely important and has a significant impact on a person’s overall health and wellbeing. According to a recent survey by the NHS, one in eight 5 to 19 year olds had at least one mental disorder when assessed. As a parent, you play a crucial role in your child’s mental health. Fortunately, you can help improve your child’s mental health by creating a supportive family environment at home and learning the early warning signs of common mental health disorders, for example. With this in mind, here are some top ways to care for your child’s mental health. 

Develop a good bedtime routine 

Sleep plays a vital role in a child’s mental health. Research shows that there is a strong link between sleep problems and an increased risk of developing certain mental illnesses. In fact, one study found that four-year olds with sleep disorders have a much higher risk of developing symptoms of mental health conditions as six-year olds, when compared with children without sleep problems. Experts at Little Lucy Willow add – “Sleep keeps you calm, your mind alert, and recharges your body to enable you to get up and face each day.” For that reason, you must try and get your child into a good bedtime routine from a young age. Here are some top tips to help your child sleep better:

  • Create an ideal sleeping space by providing a comfortable bed, installing blackout curtains, and minimising any outdoor noise. 
  • Encourage your child not to use electronics like smartphones before bed. 
  • Get your child into a consistent routine where they go to sleep and wake up at the same time each day. Try to keep this the same on school days and weekends. 
  • Make sure that your child avoids any caffeine in the afternoon or evenings. 
  • Visit your GP if your child has been experiencing sleep problems for more than two weeks, or if the symptoms are interfering with their daily life. 

Exercise as a family 

Exercise plays an important role in a child’s overall health. Along with the physical benefits, regular exercise can greatly improve mental wellbeing. This is because physical activity releases endorphins in the brain which creates feelings of happiness and alleviates stress and anxiety. According to advice on the NHS website, children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity exercise every day.

To give you an idea, examples of moderate intensity exercise include walking to school, riding a bicycle, and playground activities. Exercising as a family is an excellent way to encourage your child to be active. It also allows you to spend quality time together as a family and build closer bonds. Playing games in the garden, going for a walk in the park, or going on a bike ride, are all fun ways to exercise together as a family. You could also encourage your child to start playing a team sport they’re interested in, such as football, rugby, or hockey. 

Encourage open communication

You must create a welcoming family environment that is built around trust and understanding. This will help your child feel comfortable telling you about any issues surrounding their mental health. Encourage open communication in your family and make sure you check on your child if you notice any changes in their behaviour i.e. they become distant or their eating habits change.

Remember that children tell people how they are feeling in several ways, not always verbally. A sudden change in behaviour may signal that your child is struggling and needs support. Always listen to your child and empathise with their feelings. Let them know that it’s natural to feel down from time to time and offer support in any way you can.

If you’re still worried about your child’s mental health, then speak with your GP or contact a mental health specialist for further advice. 

Final thoughts 

Mental health illnesses in children are becoming increasingly common and can lead to several serious long-term effects. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways for you to care for your child’s mental health. Encouraging healthy habits is a simple yet effective way to improve your child’s mental well-being. This should include exercising regularly, getting enough quality sleep, and following a nutritious diet. Along with this, you should also educate yourself on the symptoms of common mental health conditions in children and create a warm, trusting home environment that encourages open communication. Speak to a medical professional if you need to.

This guest blog was written by professional writer Chloe Walker.

 

6 Tips to lift you out of the slump of Seasonal Depression: Guest blog by Anita

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(Image: Pixabay)

If you are feeling the pinch of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), you don’t have to wait until next spring to get relief. There are several things most people can do to improve their mood and shake off seasonal depression. Check with your doctor about any of the following that may be a change in pace from your usual routine.

Take a Walk

Basic exercise like walking, biking, or swimming is not only good for people physically, but also helps to lift their spirits. Typically it works by improving circulation, getting the body in motion, and connecting them with the gym or the outdoors, all of which can improve the brain’s function and help to enhance your mood, reducing stress.

Listen to Positive Things

Being around good-natured people can also make you feel better. Anything that lifts you up and makes you feel good, even momentarily, is perfect to listen too. Enjoy music with positive lyrics and an energising beat. View comedy films and television programmes.

You might also want to listen to motivational things. Lectures on self-confidence and self-empowerment can help you learn ways to get to and keep yourself in a better mood. If you’re on the go, try listening to positive podcasts with inspirational or motivational messages. Continuous exposure to these will encourage ideas that can influence your mood and help you feel better.

Eating Healthily

With your doctor’s approval, follow an eating plan that will make you feel good as well as look good. Typically this involves three regular meals daily that total about 2,000 calories or however many your doctor recommends as well as a balanced approach with foods from all five basic food groups: dairy, grains, protein, vegetables and fruits, and healthy fats, unless your doctor stipulates otherwise. Avoid eating too much sugar, caffeine, and salt; eaten in large amounts, they may raise your blood pressure or cause bodily inflammation, which may negatively impact your mood.

Get Enough Sleep

Experts generally recommend getting between seven and eight hours of sleep each night, or sometimes as many as nine hours. If you are unable to get that much rest, take short afternoon naps of about thirty to forty-five minutes. Inadequate sleep can contribute to depression, while getting enough rest can help you to feel your best.

Try a New Hobby

When you feel down, sometimes it just means that you’ve fallen into a rut of routine, so try something new if you are able. Find a new hobby to exercise your creativity, whether that’s with dance, painting, photography, or sculpture. You could also take a noncredit class to learn more about a favorite interest or pastime. The goal is to exercise your brain and steer it away from negative thoughts while enjoying fun and different activities. 

Just make sure that whatever hobby you pick up is something you really are interested, not just something that you think you should learn. If you’re not truly interested in your new skill, you likely won’t maintain it in the long term.

Stay in Touch

Often, when we’re depressed, we isolate ourselves. However, while it may feel better in the short term, isolating from loved ones will actually worsen depression. Reconnect with distant family members or old friends. Take care of your current friendships, and be open to meeting new people who share your interests. 

Take a proactive approach to your mental health and reach out for help and support from a medical professional, should you need it. 

 

This blog was by Anita, a freelance writer from Denver, CO, USA. She studied at Colorado State University and now writes articles about health, business, family and finance. You can follow her @anitaginsburg on Twitter.

 

 

5 Ways that Spending More Time Outdoors Can Improve Your Mental Health: Guest post by Katherine Myers

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(image: Shutterstock)

Self-care is a topic that often comes up when discussing mental health. Whilst taking a bath or reading a good book might provide a short term boost to your mood, a bit of self-care will rarely provide long-lasting improvements to your state of mind. 

Spending time in nature is one of the most effective ways of boosting your mental health. In fact, the benefits of the outdoors for your mental wellbeing have been scientifically proven in a range of different studies. Something to consider if you’ve been suffering from consistent low mood recently is whether you’ve been spending enough time outdoors. 

Especially during the winter months, it’s easy to miss the few hours of daylight whilst in the office or at school. It may not seem like a big deal, however, not getting enough sunlight exposure can be very detrimental to your mental health and over time, you will start to feel the effects. Some common symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency include fatigue, sore bones and muscles and low mood.

Simply getting outdoors for a bit of time every day can have a profound effect on your wellbeing. Here are just some of the ways you’ll see your mental health improve by spending more time outside.

You’ll Feel More Creative

Creativity is often sparked by putting yourself in unfamiliar environments, which is the perfect excuse to get outside the next time you find yourself in a creative rut! Being in the outdoors is a great way to get away from other distractions to your creative process such as TV or social media, so you can properly focus on coming up with those brilliant ideas! In fact, one scientific study showed that being immersed in nature can boost your creative problem-solving abilities by 50%. 

Better Concentration

If you are someone who tends to have your head in the clouds, getting outdoors is a brilliant way to improve your concentration. Science has shown that the effects of a natural environment are huge for concentration. In fact, being in a park for as little as 20 minutes has been proven to help ADHD children focus. 

If you’re ever struggling to concentration on studying or work, maybe consider taking your work outside and see whether it’s easier to get your head down. Not only will there be fewer distractions, but the calming effect of your environment will put you in a more positive state of mind.

Better Memory

Our brains are very receptive to the natural environment, making it easier for us to memorise information. One scientific study showed that participants in a memory assessment who had been in nature prior to taking the test performed 20% better than those who hadn’t. The next time you have a big test coming up or need to memorise something important, spending some time outdoors could be a great way to focus your mind. You’ll be surprised by how much it helps!

Reduces Stress Levels

Being in a stressful environment will increase your blood pressure, anxiety and stress whilst being in a peaceful environment ha the reverse effect. For this reason, a natural setting such as a forest, the beach or park is one of the best places to relax because it completely removes you from the distractions of modern society. Being in nature lowers your blood pressure, heart rate and muscle tension. Studies have shown that even just a view of nature is often linked to lower stress levels and higher job satisfaction. 

Regular Sleeping Pattern

We need natural light and darkness to regulate our circadian rhythm (natural waking and sleeping patterns). Using our phones and computers exposes us to artificial light components that interfere with our ability to sleep. Getting a good night of sleep is critical for your mental health and factors such as stress can quickly make it difficult to maintain a good sleeping pattern. Spending time in nature is the best way to reset your natural circadian rhythm and get a better night of sleep.

If you’ve been feeling down or anxious, it can be even more difficult than normal to find the motivation to get outside. However, here are a few ways that you can fit some time in nature into your schedule without making too much effort. We promise it will make a huge difference!

  • Take a walk on your lunch break
  • Get out for a run in the morning
  • Go hiking with friends
  • Take a book to your local park
  • Try and walk to work or school if you can
  • Try and spend your day in a room with lots of natural light or large windows 
  • Try and incorporate more plants into your living space

 

This guest post was written by freelance writer Katherine Myers. 

4 Ways to ease the fear of your Doctor Appointments: Guest blog by Ani O

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(image: Tumblr)

Many of us consider a visit to the doctor’s office one full of worries about what they may tell you about your health. However, checking in with your doctor regularly is a great way to ensure that you stay healthy and catch any problems before they become major medical conditions. If you’re fearful of going to the doctor’s office, here are four ways to help ease that tension.

Research Your Doctor

One of the biggest things that can create fear about going to the doctor is the  unknown. You can help to ease some of your fear by doing some research online. Look at the medical facilities website and find the about section for your doctor, if there is one. You may discover a picture and a list of their qualifications and specialties. Just being able to see a picture of your new doctor can go a long ways towards easing anxiety about your upcoming visit.

Ask Questions About the Little Concerns

If you get a sense of overwhelming fear when you think about your upcoming doctor’s visit, it’s a good time to stop and ask questions. The stacking of multiple questions on top of one another likely is what’s keeping that fear alive inside of you. How early do you show up? What identification do they need from me? Do I have to fill out any paperwork if private care? These are all questions you can ask the medical office administration staff when you book your appointment. Getting answers to the small questions can help
to alleviate much of the fear associated with your upcoming visit.

Ask A Friend or Family Member  to Go Along

If you’re fearful of a doctor’s visit, then simply have someone you know go with you. Whether this is your parent, a spouse, boyfriend, girlfriend, or just your best friend, have someone you are comfortable around come with you. It’s easier to face fear when you have the strength and comfort of others you know around you.

 

Don’t Think You’re the Only One

We all tend to get a little anxiety when it comes to going to a doctor’s visit. It’s like we’re getting a grade on how well we’re taking care of our body. So, don’t get yourself caught up in the fact that there’s something wrong with you that you have anxiety about your appointment. Realize that most people do and it’s just a natural part of the human experience.

Easing your fear about going to the doctor’s office can be fairly simple as long as you have the right steps to do so. The above four tips should do wonders for alleviating most of your fear of your upcoming doctor’s visit. Remember that you’re not alone and you can get through it just like everybody else has.

 

This guest post was written by freelance writer Ani O, in the USA.

Christmas for CAMHS Campaign to brighten up Children’s Christmas in Mental health wards: Guest post

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(image: Christmas for CAMHS charity)

Christmas for CAMHS (Children and Adolescent Mental Health Services) are a registered charity providing gifts each year for children and young people who are in mental health units in the UK over the Christmas holiday. They say,

Our aim is to make as many children and young people who are inpatients over the Christmas holidays feel thought-about, special and included.

We have been hugely supported over the past few years by generous donations from the public and have received much gratitude as a result from inpatient units. However, we are only able to provide gifts with your charitable donations. ‘

Christmas For CAMHS was originally set up because volunteers saw a huge disparity in the way CAMHS units were treated over the festive period compared to other NHS services for children and young people. They wanted to do something to change that and say,

‘Children are admitted to CAMHS units to receive support and treatment for mental health issues. There are no official figures for how many children will spend the festive season in CAMHS units across the UK. While many members of the public and corporate donors give Christmas gifts to Children’s hospitals or children’s wards in general hospitals, CAMHS units, which are usually based away from other services, are often forgotten, or not known about.’

Ro Bevan, doctor and founder says,

‘Five years ago I worked in a children’s hospital at Christmas time and there were many presents donated, mostly from corporate donors. There were so many presents that there was enough leftover for patients’ birthdays until June of the following year. A year later, I was working in child and adolescent mental health. We had no presents donated. Our patients had one present each, chosen by the therapy team, paid for out of the ward’s budget – saved from the NHS budget that is meant to cover therapeutic activities, and other expenses. I posted about the inequality on Facebook and before I knew it, my post had goneviral with 1,032 shares and so many supportive comments. It inspired me to start a group the following year and together we have raised over £1,000 to help children who would otherwise be forgotten by the generous public.

‘We don’t know whether this disparity is because people just don’t know that there
are children in mental health hospitals, or whether it’s indicative of the stigma that
society attaches to mental health issues. Regardless, we’re hoping to raise
awareness and address the balance. Although this project started with a simple
Facebook post, it has already gone further than I ever could’ve imagined possible
and reaching units across the UK which is a dream come true.’

This year, a special advent calendar has been designed by Sam Barakat, featuring  positive quotes every day, rather than chocolate. As well as this, there will be 32 windows, one for every day from December 1st to January 1st. 50 will also be donated to mental health units via Christmas for CAMHS. Sam says, ‘For many, Christmas is a joyful time that is spent with friends and family. For others, it can be the hardest time of year. This could be due to past events, trauma,  loneliness  or mental illness. ‘

I (Eleanor) feel this is such an incredible campaign that will touch the hearts of many. I was in a CAMHS unit aged 16 over Christmas and think this will help many people.  

You can donate and buy a calendar here for someone struggling : https://www.gofundme.com/f/a-mental-wellbeing-advent-calendar?utm_source=customer&utm_medium=copy_link&utm_campaign=p_cf+share-flow-1

To donate to Christmas for CAMHS and give presents to ill children click here: http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/fund/
CAMHS2019

Website and more information: www.christmasforcamhs.org.uk

 

How I recovered from depression and suicidal thoughts to form a fashion brand: Guest blog by Byron Donovan, CEO of Grey Matter

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(image: model at Grey Matter: http://www.greymatterstore.com)

Hello, I’m Byron, I’m twenty-three and I’m the Co-founder and CEO of Grey Matter. If I’m completely honest, I don’t write much … So why should you take two minutes out of your day to read this?

Sometimes two minutes is all it takes to change your life.. sounds cliché but it’s true. Four years ago I took two minutes out of my day to send an email that led to a meeting which changed my life.

At the time, I was in a depressed state, having suicidal thoughts every day, I felt lost in life and had lost all direction after coming out of a bad breakup. Up until this point in my life, I had failed my education, taken a dead-end job, I felt like “the stupid one” of my friends, I went down a dark path with bad habits. I had two older high achieving siblings, I just felt like I was never going to be successful because I was raised believing the definition of “success” and “happiness” was a University degree, a good job and a loving relationship. And I didn’t have any of those things.

If I’m honest, I felt like a complete failure. The relationship I had just come out of was the only part of my life where I was growing and now that was over, I felt stagnant and completely lost with a pain that was constantly there. The meeting was with a family friend, someone who I didn’t know that well at the time but I had admired and felt inspired by for quite some time, and that meeting helped change my outlook on life.

It changed my outlook because I opened up about where I was at in my life, and realised that the person I was speaking to had also been through a similar past, with the same grades, the same depression about work and the same suicidal thoughts. But was able to get out of that stage of his life, and was now running a successful business, and had a loving family.

This helped me see myself in a new light, it made me realise that maybe one day I too could have those things.

From this I became obsessed with self-development.. reading books, listening to podcasts, surrounding myself with positive and uplifting people. I started to realise that the future can be brighter than my past, and tomorrow can be better than yesterday.

A big turning point for me was believing that your current circumstances and struggles don’t define you and are instead trying to teach you something. And honestly, that state of thinking has got me out of the darkest thoughts and stages of my life.

Fast forward a few years, and my friends and I have now formed a fashion brand called Grey Matter that was created to have a positive impact on people’s mental health. We wanted to create a fashion brand that stands for the people that feel lost, the anxious, the kind, the weirdos, the dreamers, the creatives.

We strive to empower others by sharing stories and encouraging conversation through our apparel. And our goal is that through those stories people can find a similar hope as I did and spread support.

I always love hearing about others peoples stories and meeting like-minded people, so feel free to reach out to me if any of this resonated with you, and also check out Grey Matter if you’d like to see what we’re up to! (Instagram: @greymatter.ldn Facebook: @greymatterldn Website: www.greymatterstore.com ).

Since that meeting four years ago, I have since mentioned to that guy how he changed my life, and he replied with “You sent the first email, remember that”. I guess what I’m trying to say is, you can overcome your current struggles and limitations that may be holding you back with the help of others. So don’t be afraid to reach out to people, as more often than not they want to help, and you never know what might come of it.
Thank you for reading and I hope this helps.

All the best,

Byron
Email: info@greymatterstore.com

Instagram: @byrondonovann’

How stressed are UK Students in 2019? Guest post by the Natwest Student Living Index

 

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(Image: Natwest Student Living Index)

The NatWest Student Living Index 2019 has launched recently,  delving into both stress and mental health for students at university.
https://personal.natwest.com/personal/life-moments/students-and-graduates/student-living-index.html

University-age students are more engaged with mental health and wellbeing than ever, and the study found that 1 in 4 students are very satisfied with their university’s mental health support.

Other noteworthy findings from the survey include:
• 71% of students say that their university offers affordable health and wellbeing programs (gym classes, yoga, meditation, mindfulness)
• 40% of students are concerned about their financial situation following university
• 45% of students find their university degree stressful
• 1 in 4 UK students find managing money stressful

The 2019 NatWest Student Living Index revealed that close to half of all UK students feel
extremely stressed by their degree studies. 1 in 4 students in the UK described managing their money as extremely stressful, while only 6% felt they received sufficient money management support from their university on average.

NatWest’s Student Living Index 2019 asked students from 35 top university cities about all aspects of student life, including the amount of wellbeing and mental health support on offer for students at university in 2019.

Is their degree the cause of the stress? On average, 45% of students in the UK feel extremely stressed by their degree  Cambridge (60%) and Durham (57%) students are the most stressed by their degree studies.
Have Universities supported students with mental health resources?

1 in 4 students are very satisfied with their university’s mental health resources, while 71% said that their university offers affordable health and wellbeing programs.
Interestingly, while students in Poole feel the most stressed by money management, the city also came last when students were asked about the availability of affordable well-being programs:

 53% of students in Poole said their university offers affordable well-being programs, this is the lowest ranked city and 18% below national average.

 Less than 1% of Students in Reading and Stirling feel supported by their university when managing their finances.

 94% of students in Aberystwyth feel their university offers affordable well-being programs

Are you a student in the UK? Read more about the findings here:  https://personal.natwest.com/personal/life-moments/students-and-graduates/student-living-index.html

Can Hypnotherapy be used for insecurity and self-esteem? Guest blog by A Time to Change Hypnotherapy

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(image: hypnotherapyhorizons.com)

 

Frequently asked questions and useful information for you to know:

Low self-esteem and insecurity are common issues that weigh on people’s minds daily. Some people experience harmful effects of insecurity more severely than others and seek various methods of self-help. On the other hand, those don’t know how to safely deal with these emotions turn to more harmful methods of relief.

If you have tried countless self-help fads or simply try to continuously block out internalized negativity, hypnotherapy may be the solution for you.

What is hypnotherapy?

There are many hypnotherapy techniques, but they all involve inducing a state of hypnosis, or relaxed focus, to connect with your subconscious mind. This creates an open and reflective state of mind that addresses negative emotions and visualizes change. In other words, you can use hypnotherapy to bring about an intense awareness and focus for the change you desire in your own life.

Is there any science behind it?

Hypnotherapy relies heavily on the science of brainwave patterns. The brain is always experiencing a level of electrical energy. And when those waves are occurring within a certain frequency range, you’re relaxed, but awake – your subconscious is receptive to new behavioural suggestions. This is when a hypnotherapist can use visualisation exercises to guide you to a more positive outlook.

How can hypnotherapy help my self-esteem?

Low self-esteem is caused by a constant spiral of negative thoughts. These thoughts could be caused by negative emotions culminating from childhood trauma. Thoughts like, “I’m not good enough” and other harmful subconscious judgements will keep you down.

Low self-esteem also causes or increases the side effects of mental health issues like depression, anxiety, and internalised emotional blockages.

Hypnotherapy for self-esteem creates new neural pathways that foster positive thoughts and emotions. Use hypnotherapy to rewrite negative mantras, from “I can’t” to “I can.” With hypnotherapy, you can change your harmful thoughts into positive thoughts about yourself and your surroundings. If you are looking for more resources A Time For Change hypnotherapy has incredible resources to help with issues ranging from vocational skill improvement and motivation, to managing unwanted behavior.

Can hypnotherapy cure my insecurity?

Like self-esteem issues, insecurity about one’s self and surroundings is common. Insecurity manifests in a variety of ways. You have insecurity if you experience a daily lack of confidence, have trouble speaking to strangers, or authority figures, can’t articulate what you need from your romantic partner, or experience paranoia that people are judging you.

Although hypnotherapy is not a cure-all, it can significantly turn around those negative thoughts and emotions related to insecurity. Seek out hypnotherapy for insecurity for help in choosing a romantic partner, performing work tasks with more confidence, and approaching life with a more positive outlook.

How many sessions do I have to attend to see results?

Hypnotherapy is a way for you to be in control of your subconscious mind. It helps you connect with subconscious memories, trauma, and negative thoughts in order to break old patterns and manifest positivity.

Some people might notice results within a few sessions, while others will need to work more at length with a hypnotherapist. Patience will lead to a continuation of positive thoughts.

Is there anything else I need to know about hypnotherapy?

Before your first visit with your hypnotherapist, make sure you are ready to see the change in your own life. Hypnotherapy is a powerful tool that is used to change the negative to the positive. However, always ask your healthcare provider for more information if you are dealing with serious mental illness.

 

This guest blog was written by A Time to Change hypnotherapy, based in the USA