The Top 5 Apps to Support Mental Wellbeing for 2020: by loveitcoverit

(image: Unsplash)

With Brew Monday upon us, the pursuit to get the public talking is as prevalent as ever. The event itself, hosted by the Samaritans charity group, encourages individuals to come together for a coffee morning at work, at home, or in any other place that they can think of. The session offers a safe space to freely and confidently talk about what is bothering us, what we are feeling and perhaps explore why we feel that way – stamping out the notion of Blue Monday entirely.

In recent years, an epidemic of loneliness and social isolation has grown unthinkably. Research conducted by the British Red Cross staggeringly found that over 9 million people always, or often, feel lonely. Now, to put that into context, the population of London currently sits at approximately 8.8 million – so this is not something that can be ignored!

However, it’s not difficult to understand that some individuals would prefer to stay silent and not communicate the struggles that they are facing to a family member, friend, or professional. Our mental wellbeing is delicate, and we often worry about public perception. So, if you’re looking for help but don’t feel ready to directly speak with someone, here are the top 5 apps to support your mental wellbeing for 2020.

 

  • What’s Up 

What’s Up – not to be confused with WhatsApp – is an innovative platform that allows individuals to receive Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) or Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) from the comfort of their own home. 

The application offers resources and online forums that prompt individuals to work through whatever they are struggling with – whether this is depression, anxiety, loneliness or something they can’t quite put their finger on. 

A key feature that makes What’s Up (and any behavioural therapy method) so valuable is the identification of negative behaviours and thoughts. In doing so, the CBT method allows people to re-educate themselves on how to think and behave so that they can better their own minds and carry the learnt practices forward.

 

  • MeeTwo

Unsurprisingly, smartphones in relation to children or young adults have always been a controversial subject. It’s been found that the main concerns for parents when allowing their child to have access to a smartphone rests on the risk of them talking to strangers or becoming victims of cyberbullying

However, it’s important to reflect that smartphones can also offer a great level of support for young people’s mental wellbeing – and with young adults being found as more likely to suffer from loneliness than any other age demographic, the conversation is more pertinent than ever.

For instance, MeeTwo is a safely monitored application that is completely tailored toward teenagers. The platform provides young people with support from peers and professionals as well as providing educational and interactive resources to assist in their self-help journey. An element of the application that is particularly noteworthy is the in-app links that direct individuals to UK charities and helplines. So, if a user’s struggle needs a different avenue of support, they know exactly where to turn!

 

  • Headspace

In our busy lives, it can be difficult to find time to just pause. The days can sometimes fly by without us feeling like we’ve had a chance to reflect on our successes, failures or everyday struggles and it’s almost like we’re being pulled along by some external force. As a result, we often feel out of control and exhausted. 

Headspace is an app that brilliantly helps combat these feelings, bringing us fully into the present moment and helping achieve mindfulness! To do so, the application introduces a range of meditation practices. 

This can seem daunting, especially if you’ve never tried meditation previously, but Headspace offers different guides for different experience levels so that you are always in control!

 

  • TalkLife 

Even if you don’t want to talk with someone face-to-face, you may still want to talk. That’s why TalkLife is such an incredible application. 

Once downloaded, you have access to a community that is ready to listen in a safe and anonymous environment – allowing you to form social connections that you may feel are missing from your life. To ensure safety, TalkLife is monitored with real-time safeguarding.

It’s important to recognise that the conversations had on the platform are between peers and not professionals, so if you are seeking medical advice or professional therapeutic support you will need to get in touch with a qualified medical practitioner.

 

  • Spotify

If you don’t want to talk, then it’s sometimes good to listen. Spotify offers a whole host of incredible podcasts that tackle various mental health issues – perhaps putting something into words that you can’t. 

If you’re looking for a podcast to begin with, Mentally Yours is fantastic. Each week the hosts are joined by a mystery guest and together they talk about the weird and out-of-place thoughts that pass through their minds. 

Mental health struggles can be scary. We too often try to hide them, ignore them or deny them – but the world is evolving and as is our understanding. So, it’s time to be brave and give yourself the support that you deserve.

 

This sponsored post was written for you by loveitcoverit,  one of the UK’s largest mobile phone and gadget insurers, having helped over 1 million customers get comprehensive cover.

6 Tips to lift you out of the slump of Seasonal Depression: Guest blog by Anita

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(Image: Pixabay)

If you are feeling the pinch of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), you don’t have to wait until next spring to get relief. There are several things most people can do to improve their mood and shake off seasonal depression. Check with your doctor about any of the following that may be a change in pace from your usual routine.

Take a Walk

Basic exercise like walking, biking, or swimming is not only good for people physically, but also helps to lift their spirits. Typically it works by improving circulation, getting the body in motion, and connecting them with the gym or the outdoors, all of which can improve the brain’s function and help to enhance your mood, reducing stress.

Listen to Positive Things

Being around good-natured people can also make you feel better. Anything that lifts you up and makes you feel good, even momentarily, is perfect to listen too. Enjoy music with positive lyrics and an energising beat. View comedy films and television programmes.

You might also want to listen to motivational things. Lectures on self-confidence and self-empowerment can help you learn ways to get to and keep yourself in a better mood. If you’re on the go, try listening to positive podcasts with inspirational or motivational messages. Continuous exposure to these will encourage ideas that can influence your mood and help you feel better.

Eating Healthily

With your doctor’s approval, follow an eating plan that will make you feel good as well as look good. Typically this involves three regular meals daily that total about 2,000 calories or however many your doctor recommends as well as a balanced approach with foods from all five basic food groups: dairy, grains, protein, vegetables and fruits, and healthy fats, unless your doctor stipulates otherwise. Avoid eating too much sugar, caffeine, and salt; eaten in large amounts, they may raise your blood pressure or cause bodily inflammation, which may negatively impact your mood.

Get Enough Sleep

Experts generally recommend getting between seven and eight hours of sleep each night, or sometimes as many as nine hours. If you are unable to get that much rest, take short afternoon naps of about thirty to forty-five minutes. Inadequate sleep can contribute to depression, while getting enough rest can help you to feel your best.

Try a New Hobby

When you feel down, sometimes it just means that you’ve fallen into a rut of routine, so try something new if you are able. Find a new hobby to exercise your creativity, whether that’s with dance, painting, photography, or sculpture. You could also take a noncredit class to learn more about a favorite interest or pastime. The goal is to exercise your brain and steer it away from negative thoughts while enjoying fun and different activities. 

Just make sure that whatever hobby you pick up is something you really are interested, not just something that you think you should learn. If you’re not truly interested in your new skill, you likely won’t maintain it in the long term.

Stay in Touch

Often, when we’re depressed, we isolate ourselves. However, while it may feel better in the short term, isolating from loved ones will actually worsen depression. Reconnect with distant family members or old friends. Take care of your current friendships, and be open to meeting new people who share your interests. 

Take a proactive approach to your mental health and reach out for help and support from a medical professional, should you need it. 

 

This blog was by Anita, a freelance writer from Denver, CO, USA. She studied at Colorado State University and now writes articles about health, business, family and finance. You can follow her @anitaginsburg on Twitter.