Talking for the Jami Mental Health Awareness Shabbat 2020 by Eleanor

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As some of you will be aware, back in 2017-2018, I helped as a volunteer with fellow volunteers (Lisa Coffman and others) to found the Mental Health Awareness Shabbat (Jewish sabbath) in our communities across the country here in the UK. The initiative, led by the mental health charity Jami and conceived by Rabbi Daniel Epstein, now runs in 150 Jewish communities.

This year, my dad Mike and I were delighted to be asked to share our father and daughter journey with bipolar disorder to Chigwell and Hainault Synagogue.

I have social anxiety- which includes at times a fear of public speaking. In December, I had a breakthrough, where I spoke for a short time at a conference called Limmud alongside my Dad and read from my book Bring me to Light. So, when we were asked to do this talk at Chigwell, I felt it could be possible.

I armed myself with the fact that I knew kind people in the community including the Rabbi and his wife and friends of my husband Rob (its the community he grew up in). I also wanted to share my story to help other people.

So, we stayed with a lovely lady in the community and had friday night dinner with the Rabbi and his family. On Saturday morning, I woke up feeling a little nervous but took my trusted anxiety medication for when I need it- Propranolol, and walked to the synagogue with Dad.

I managed not to have a panic attack and the thought of speaking to help others got me through (as did distraction, deep breathing and drinking a glass of water).

So, at the end of the service, we were called up to speak. Dad went first and talked about his journey with bipolar disorder from when it started for him in 1991 to finding recovery. Then, it was my turn.

I stood up there in the pulpit speaking to a packed audience with a prepared speech. I felt scared but also empowered and began to relax into the talk. I knew that by sharing what happened to me, being sectioned and so ill and talking openly, that I could break stigma and touch others. I was also so proud of my Dad for speaking so openly.

It was only after, when talking to people after the service, that we realised that about 150 people came to listen to our talk! We had some important conversations with people after our talk including someone very newly diagnosed and someone else whose niece had bipolar and is currently very ill.

I couldn’t and still can’t believe I was able to do that. However, since I have been very tired so trying to de-stress and rest as much as I can!

We just want to thank everyone who came to hear our talk and supported us, to every person who thanked us for coming and shared their stories with us. We are so grateful for such a positive reception and thank Rabbi Davis and the Chigwell community for having us.

The Mental Health Awareness Shabbat has had events in communities all across the country. It runs yearly and you can find out more here 

4 Ways to ease the fear of your Doctor Appointments: Guest blog by Ani O

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(image: Tumblr)

Many of us consider a visit to the doctor’s office one full of worries about what they may tell you about your health. However, checking in with your doctor regularly is a great way to ensure that you stay healthy and catch any problems before they become major medical conditions. If you’re fearful of going to the doctor’s office, here are four ways to help ease that tension.

Research Your Doctor

One of the biggest things that can create fear about going to the doctor is the  unknown. You can help to ease some of your fear by doing some research online. Look at the medical facilities website and find the about section for your doctor, if there is one. You may discover a picture and a list of their qualifications and specialties. Just being able to see a picture of your new doctor can go a long ways towards easing anxiety about your upcoming visit.

Ask Questions About the Little Concerns

If you get a sense of overwhelming fear when you think about your upcoming doctor’s visit, it’s a good time to stop and ask questions. The stacking of multiple questions on top of one another likely is what’s keeping that fear alive inside of you. How early do you show up? What identification do they need from me? Do I have to fill out any paperwork if private care? These are all questions you can ask the medical office administration staff when you book your appointment. Getting answers to the small questions can help
to alleviate much of the fear associated with your upcoming visit.

Ask A Friend or Family Member  to Go Along

If you’re fearful of a doctor’s visit, then simply have someone you know go with you. Whether this is your parent, a spouse, boyfriend, girlfriend, or just your best friend, have someone you are comfortable around come with you. It’s easier to face fear when you have the strength and comfort of others you know around you.

 

Don’t Think You’re the Only One

We all tend to get a little anxiety when it comes to going to a doctor’s visit. It’s like we’re getting a grade on how well we’re taking care of our body. So, don’t get yourself caught up in the fact that there’s something wrong with you that you have anxiety about your appointment. Realize that most people do and it’s just a natural part of the human experience.

Easing your fear about going to the doctor’s office can be fairly simple as long as you have the right steps to do so. The above four tips should do wonders for alleviating most of your fear of your upcoming doctor’s visit. Remember that you’re not alone and you can get through it just like everybody else has.

 

This guest post was written by freelance writer Ani O, in the USA.