How To Tell If You Or A Loved One Needs Psychiatric Help by Brooke Chaplan.

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Mental illness can affect anyone, regardless of age, gender, or background. It is important to recognise the signs and symptoms of mental illness in order to get help as soon as possible. Knowing what to look for can be tricky, so here are some common warning signs that you or a loved one may need psychiatric help.  

Unexplained Changes in Mood and Behaviour  

One of the most common signs of mental illness is a sudden and unexplained change in mood or behaviour. This could include changes in sleep patterns, eating habits, energy levels, attitude towards others, or motivation levels. If you notice any sudden shifts in these areas that last more than two weeks and cannot be attributed to a specific event or life change, it may indicate an underlying mental health issue.  

Negative Self-Talk or Rumination  

Another sign that someone needs professional help is if they frequently engage in negative self-talk or ruminate on the same thoughts over and over again. For example, if they often say things like “I’m not good enough” or “I can’t do anything right” without any basis for those statements, this could be a sign that something more serious is going on beneath the surface. Additionally, if someone spends hours every day thinking about their mistakes from the past without being able to move forward—this could also be an indication that professional help is necessary.  

Isolation from Friends and Family  

Finally, if someone begins isolating themselves from friends and family members more often than usual—or does not seem interested in having conversations with them—this could be another indicator that something more serious is happening mentally. It’s normal for people to want some alone time once in a while—but if you notice your loved one consistently avoiding social activities and interactions with others over long periods of time—it may mean they need extra emotional support from a professional psychiatrist before they can get back on track.   

Other Behaviours

Other behaviours you should watch out for is frequent tearfulness, self harm thoughts or ideas, suicidal thoughts and ideation- as this indicates someone is reaching a crisis point with their mental health. In some there may be an increase in activity or mania. This can lead to psychosis- where your mind loses touch with reality, common in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia (but can also happen outside these conditions).

Mental health issues are complex and often difficult to recognise at first glance. However, it’s important to understand that early intervention can make all the difference when it comes to managing mental illness effectively. If you notice any of these warning signs in yourself or a loved one—don’t hesitate to reach out for help!

Professional psychiatric services should always be sought out when necessary as this will create better outcomes for everyone involved in the long run. In the UK, that may be via the NHS but due to overwhelmed services, if you can afford private treatment, go down this route as it will be quicker!

This article was. written by Brooke Chaplan, freelance writer.

Emotional Eating: How To Manage Triggers By Lizzie Weakley.

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Do you find yourself reaching for food to fill an emotional void? Do you often find yourself snacking out of boredom or anxiety? Emotional eating is a common problem that many people struggle with, but it doesn’t have to be something that controls your life. Here are some tips and strategies for managing emotional eating triggers and developing healthy habits.

Identifying Your Triggers

The first step in overcoming emotional eating is to identify the triggers that lead to it. Everyone has different triggers, so it is important to take the time and reflect on what causes you to turn to food when feeling overwhelmed or stressed. Some of the most common triggers include boredom, stress, loneliness, sadness, anger, fatigue, and anxiety. Once you have identified your particular triggers, then you can start taking steps towards addressing them.

Learning New Coping Mechanisms

The next step is to learn new coping mechanisms that allow you to manage these emotions without turning to food. This could be physical activities such as going for a walk or jog, doing yoga, or any other type of exercise that helps reduce stress levels.

It could also be trying out mindfulness techniques such as meditation and deep breathing exercises which can help centre your thoughts and help clear out negative feelings. Other methods could include talking with friends or writing down your thoughts in a journal in order to gain some clarity about why you are feeling certain emotions and how best to work through them.

Taking an Online Coaching Course

Finally, another great way of managing emotional eating triggers is by taking an online emotional eating coaching course designed specifically for this purpose. An online coaching course can provide the guidance needed in order to make meaningful lifestyle changes that will help overcome emotional eating patterns over time. The course will provide tips on how best to manage cravings and difficult emotions while also teaching techniques on how best to maintain healthy habits long-term while learning positive self-care practices along the way.

Emotional eating can be a difficult habit to break but with the right strategies in place, it can become manageable over time! Taking the steps outlined above such as identifying your triggers, learning new coping mechanisms, and taking an online coaching course are all great ways of helping manage emotional eating triggers while developing healthier habits along the way. With dedication and effort this problem can improve significantly!

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer.